Προηγούμενες Εκδηλώσεις

Canadian Institute Open Meeting & Scott Gallimore

Date: 
Πέμπτη, Μάιος 24, 2018 -
19:00 to 20:30
Location: 
Danish Institute, Herefondos 14A
Event Description: 

Prof. David W. Rupp (Director/Directeur), "The Activities of the Institute, 2017-2018"

Prof. Scott Gallimore (Wilfrid Laurier University), "An Island in Crisis? Re-evaluating the Formation of Roman Crete"

The conquest of Crete by Rome from 69–67 BC remains poorly understood in terms of its impacts on the island before and after the invasion. From an archaeological perspective, it takes decades before noticeable changes are apparent in Crete’s material culture. This paper will explore this topic by viewing available data through the lens of eventful archaeology, the archaeology of crisis, and resilience theory to reassess the formation of Roman Crete.

Lecture by Emily K. Varto

Date: 
Τετάρτη, Μάιος 2, 2018 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr. Emily K. Varto (Associate Professor, Department of Classics, Dalhousie University), "Greeks, Romans, and the 'Science of Man': Towards a History of Classics and Early Anthropology"

Ancient Greece and Rome played varying roles in early anthropological thinking, from the observations of colonial officials and missionaries to the evolutionary ethnology and ethnography of the late nineteenth century, and beyond into the professionalized social sciences of the twentieth century. Grounded in themes that emerged in the course editing a volume on the classics and early anthropology (published April 2018 with Brill), this talk augments and reevaluates the formative, early relationship between the two disciplines and explores its continuing impact.

Lecture by Bartłomiej Lis

Date: 
Τετάρτη, Μάρτιος 28, 2018 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr Bartłomiej (Bartek) Lis (Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow, British School at Athens), “Migrants in the 12th-century BC Aegean: A guide to identification”

One of the hallmarks of the decades following the collapse of the Mycenaean palaces is an increased human mobility. This phenomenon is directly implied by changes in particular settlements and broader settlement patterns at that time. Many sites were abandoned or significantly diminish in size, while others became (or continued to be) highly prosperous, like Tiryns or Lefkandi. Messenia provides an example of an entire region that appears to be heavily depopulated.

But how are we to identify this mobility – and migrants – in the archaeological record on a more individual level? Identification of foreigners, i.e. people coming from distant regions beyond the extent of the Mycenaean culture, appears to be least problematic, and several examples already discussed in the literature will be presented including Cypriots (or people very familiar with Cypriot practices) at Tiryns or population groups from Southern Italy spread all over the Mainland. Much less straightforward, to say the least, is the attempt to identify people arriving from an adjacent region within the same cultural milieu, and this issue will constitute the main focus of this lecture.

The way to approach this problem is – in my opinion – through technology involved in craft production, which might be considered a special case of social practice. The advantage of technology for approaching mobility is that it is much less ambiguous than other aspects of material culture usually taken into consideration. I will focus on technology involved in pottery production – with an emphasis on Aeginetan pottery produced beyond the island along the Euboean Gulf – but the discussion will involve also other crafts as well as more mundane daily practices. Furthermore, I would also like to question an uncritical use of two terms - import and imitation – which quite often diverts us from the proper understanding of particular objects in their contexts and, in the cases presented in this lecture, from detecting possible presence of migrants. The analysis will lead not only to identification of migrants’ presence, but also – at least in one case – to isolation of their possible dwelling at the site of Lefkandi.

Lecture by Christopher J. Cornthwaite

Date: 
Τετάρτη, Μάρτιος 14, 2018 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Christopher J. Cornthwaite (Neda & Franz Leipen Fellow, The Canadian Institute in Greece; Ph.D. Candidate, Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto), “In the Shadow of Home: Jews, Syrians, and Religion in Delos and Corinth 200BCE-100CE”

The story of a roaming evangelist who made Corinth a main port of call on his Mediterranean tour is woven into our cultural mythology. But Paul’s success in Corinth came from more than his apparent passion as an itinerant preacher. The community in which Christianity spread there was formed before Paul’s arrival, already gathering as an immigrant religion at the nexus of a trans-Mediterranean trade route. Furthermore, Christianity was only one of many immigrant religions from the Levant that came west and attracted a large following beyond the boundaries of its ethnos. The sanctuary of the Syrian goddess (Atargatis) on Delos a hundred years earlier has a remarkably similar story. Brought to Delos by a Syrian priest, her worship outgrew the Syrian diaspora there, attracting outsiders as it moved on toward Rome. This talk compares how and why these two groups grew and attracted outsiders and how they negotiated the problems of identity that new members created. It then puts them in the broader contexts of religion and migration in the Graeco-Roman Mediterranean.

Lecture by George W.M. Harrison

Date: 
Κυριακή, Μάρτιος 11, 2018 -
14:00 to 15:00
Location: 
303 Paterson, Carleton University, Ottawa
Event Description: 

Professor George W.M. Harrison (Department of Greek and Roman Studies, Carleton University), "What Saved Satyr Drama?"

George Harrison has been researching satyrs since 2000. His production of Euripides’ Cyclops is the first full-scale commercial production of a satyr drama since antiquity and his conference volume the first full length study of the subject. Now, as part of preparations of a follow-up full-length study, he explores the question of what  was about satyr drama that made it so compelling. What Saved Satyr Drama looks at the evidence for the wide and persistent appeal of a specialized genre best known as a ‘light’ and short play capping the tragic trilogies associated with Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides.

Screening of Canadian Film

Date: 
Τετάρτη, Φεβρουάριος 28, 2018 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Screening of the Canadian Film “Stories We Tell” (2012; 1 hour 48 minutes; English)

In this inspired, genre-twisting film, Oscar-nominated writer/director Sarah Polley discovers that the truth depends on who's telling it. Polley is both filmmaker and detective as she investigates the secrets kept by a family of storytellers. She playfully interviews and interrogates a cast of characters of varying reliability, eliciting refreshingly candid, yet mostly contradictory, answers to the same questions. As each relates their version of the family mythology, present-day recollections shift into nostalgia-tinged glimpses of their mother, who departed too soon, leaving a trail of unanswered questions. Polley unravels the paradoxes to reveal the essence of family: always complicated, warmly messy and fiercely loving.

Winner of 24 awards at film festivals around the world, Stories We Tell explores the elusive nature of truth and memory, but at its core is a deeply personal film about how our narratives shape and define us as individuals and families, all interconnecting to paint a profound, funny and poignant picture of the larger human story.

Hans Beck

Date: 
Κυριακή, Φεβρουάριος 18, 2018 -
14:00 to 15:00
Location: 
R303 Paterson Hall, Carleton University, Ottawa
Event Description: 

Prof. Hans Beck (McGill University), "A Local History of Ancient Greece"

Lecture by Céline Murphy

Date: 
Τετάρτη, Φεβρουάριος 14, 2018 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr Céline Murphy (The Heritage Management Organisation), "How, when, who and what? Revisiting the fragmentation of Minoan peak sanctuary figurines"

Because of their allegedly ‘careless’ production and ‘poor’ appearance, it has been widely assumed that Minoan peak sanctuary figurines were not items made to last but that they were made to be broken as part of the rituals taking place on site. These assumptions, however, have rarely been questioned. Drawing upon a direct examination of – and experimental research on – a range of such artefacts, I here explore the implications that the aforementioned statements have on our understanding of human and non-human agency in the context of peak sanctuary figurine breakage. Starting with an examination of the material conditions upon which these items’ deposition at peak sanctuaries relied – namely their solid and sound manufacture – I propose that the figurines might also have been placed on display at the sites, and may not have been as immediately broken as is usually believed. Moreover, the figurines may not have been uniquely broken by humans: influence from the wider context in which they were deposited may have played a significant role in their fragmentation. In this light, it is conceivable that the breakage of peak sanctuary figurines occurred over time, over several generations, and consisted of a long-term process rather than an event isolated in a single moment. In this presentation, I therefore suggest that non-human-provoked material decay can also be considered as a form of fragmentation where Minoan peak sanctuary figurines are concerned.

Book Launch by John Bennet & Giorgos Vavouranakis

Date: 
Τετάρτη, Ιανουάριος 31, 2018 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Book Launch: David W. Rupp & Jonathan E. Tomlinson (ed.), “From Maple to Olive. Proceedings of a Colloquium to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of the Canadian Institute in Greece, Athens 10-11 June 2016” (Publications of the CIG 10), Athens.

Presented by Professor John Bennet (Director, British School at Athens) & Professor Giorgos Vavouranakis (Assistant Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens)

John Bintliff

Date: 
Κυριακή, Ιανουάριος 21, 2018 -
14:00 to 15:00
Location: 
R303 Paterson Hall, Carleton University, Ottawa
Event Description: 

The Early Greek polis.

By: John Bintliff, Leiden University

 

Sponsored by: the Archaeological Institute of America in Canada in collaboration with the John MacNaughton Cahir of Classics at McGill Univ. and the Ottawa Association of Friends of CIG.

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