Προηγούμενες Εκδηλώσεις

Hans Beck

Date: 
Κυριακή, Φεβρουάριος 18, 2018 -
14:00 to 15:00
Location: 
R303 Paterson Hall, Carleton University, Ottawa
Event Description: 

Prof. Hans Beck (McGill University), "A Local History of Ancient Greece"

Lecture by Céline Murphy

Date: 
Τετάρτη, Φεβρουάριος 14, 2018 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr Céline Murphy (The Heritage Management Organisation), "How, when, who and what? Revisiting the fragmentation of Minoan peak sanctuary figurines"

Because of their allegedly ‘careless’ production and ‘poor’ appearance, it has been widely assumed that Minoan peak sanctuary figurines were not items made to last but that they were made to be broken as part of the rituals taking place on site. These assumptions, however, have rarely been questioned. Drawing upon a direct examination of – and experimental research on – a range of such artefacts, I here explore the implications that the aforementioned statements have on our understanding of human and non-human agency in the context of peak sanctuary figurine breakage. Starting with an examination of the material conditions upon which these items’ deposition at peak sanctuaries relied – namely their solid and sound manufacture – I propose that the figurines might also have been placed on display at the sites, and may not have been as immediately broken as is usually believed. Moreover, the figurines may not have been uniquely broken by humans: influence from the wider context in which they were deposited may have played a significant role in their fragmentation. In this light, it is conceivable that the breakage of peak sanctuary figurines occurred over time, over several generations, and consisted of a long-term process rather than an event isolated in a single moment. In this presentation, I therefore suggest that non-human-provoked material decay can also be considered as a form of fragmentation where Minoan peak sanctuary figurines are concerned.

Book Launch by John Bennet & Giorgos Vavouranakis

Date: 
Τετάρτη, Ιανουάριος 31, 2018 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Book Launch: David W. Rupp & Jonathan E. Tomlinson (ed.), “From Maple to Olive. Proceedings of a Colloquium to celebrate the 40th Anniversary of the Canadian Institute in Greece, Athens 10-11 June 2016” (Publications of the CIG 10), Athens.

Presented by Professor John Bennet (Director, British School at Athens) & Professor Giorgos Vavouranakis (Assistant Professor of Prehistoric Archaeology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens)

John Bintliff

Date: 
Κυριακή, Ιανουάριος 21, 2018 -
14:00 to 15:00
Location: 
R303 Paterson Hall, Carleton University, Ottawa
Event Description: 

The Early Greek polis.

By: John Bintliff, Leiden University

 

Sponsored by: the Archaeological Institute of America in Canada in collaboration with the John MacNaughton Cahir of Classics at McGill Univ. and the Ottawa Association of Friends of CIG.

Lecture by Rodney D. Fitzsimons

Date: 
Τετάρτη, Δεκέμβριος 6, 2017 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr. Rodney D. Fitzsimons (Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Trent University), "Taking a Seat at the Minoan Banquet: An Architectural Approach to the Minoanisation of the Aegean Islands"

The dissemination of “Minoanising” cultural traits throughout the Aegean in the latter half of the second millennium BC has long been of interest to archaeologists working in this region of the ancient world, with recent scholarship stressing the active, rather than passive, role played by the indigenous inhabitants of the various territories participating in this process. While much emphasis has rightly been placed on the adoption and adaptation of the wide range of “imported” artefactual, artistic, administrative, and technological cultural traits throughout the region, comparable changes in the built environment that resulted from the same phenomena of “Minoanisation” have received relatively little attention to date beyond basic enumeration. This paper seeks to address this lacuna in current scholarship, using as a starting point the Northeast Bastion at Ayia Irini, Kea, where a new Minoan-style banquet hall has recently been identified, and then reassessing the evidence for and significance of the adoption and adaptation of Minoan-style architectural motifs elsewhere in the southern and eastern Aegean. The focus of this study will fall not on the ultimate origin of “imported” architectural elements, but rather on the significant changes that the adoption and adaptation of such motifs wrought on the local physical, cultural, and socio-political landscapes.

Lecture by Nanno Marinatos

Date: 
Τετάρτη, Νοέμβριος 15, 2017 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Nanno Marinatos (Professor, Department of Classics and Mediterranean Studies, University of Illinois at Chicago), “Thucydides and Pericles: Democracy and Empire”

Pericles has been traditionally identified with Athenian democracy but has also received criticism about the imperialism of Athens from modern historians. The issue is indeed complex since democracy contradicts tyranny over others. The problem is solved if one analyses Thucydides' own opinion. He is shown to be a partisan of Pericles and presents him as a political pragmatist who had a deep understanding of human nature, on the one hand, and benefits of justice, on the other.

Lecture by Emily K. Varto

Date: 
Τετάρτη, Νοέμβριος 1, 2017 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr. Emily K. Varto (Associate Professor, Department of Classics, Dalhousie University), "The Politics of Fatness in Archaic Greece"

This talk explores how modern narratives that imbue fatness with personal and communal ethical significance compare to ancient narratives of fatness, particularly in archaic Greece politics. Through examining art and poetry, it explores how fatness was not exactly a marker of elite status, but was a metaphor of the abuse of status with economic, social, and moral consequences for family, community, and state. Although elitism was central to the significance of fatness in archaic Greece, so were ideas about uncontrollable appetite, lack of restraint, and communal harm familiar to us from modern narratives about obesity and socio-economic class.

Lecture by Sabrina Higgins

Date: 
Τετάρτη, Οκτώβριος 18, 2017 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Sabrina Higgins (Assistant Professor, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Centre for Hellenic Studies, Simon Fraser University), “Imagining the Virgin: 'The Intersection of Space, Monumentality and Marian Iconography in Late Antique and Early Medieval Egypt (Third to Eleventh Centuries)”

This talk contextualizes the iconography of the Virgin Mary within the framework of Late-Antique and Early Medieval Egyptian Christianity. It situates the creation of a visual culture associated with the Virgin within its historical parameters, particularly highlighting the relatively late appearance of Marian imagery on the chronological axis of Christian Art, and examines the unique spatial considerations for the placement of these images. In doing so, the talk traces the diachronic appearance of particular Marian iconographies, while also interrogating whether particular images were localized to specific areas within ecclesiastical and monastic settings.

Aleydis Van de Moortel

Date: 
Κυριακή, Οκτώβριος 15, 2017 -
14:00 to 15:00
Location: 
R1160, Desmarais Building, University of Ottawa
Event Description: 

Shipbulding and Seafaring in the Bronze Age Aegean and the Role of the East Aegean.

By: Aleydis Van de Moortel, University of Tennessee

 

Sponsored by: the Archaeological Institute of America in Canada in collaboration with the Ottawa Association of Friends of CIG  and CIMS.

Book Presentation/Reading by W. Ruth Kozak

Date: 
Τετάρτη, Οκτώβριος 4, 2017 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Book Presentation/Reading by W. Ruth Kozak

Shadow of the Lion: Blood on the Moon, is Volume One of an epic story set in the aftermath of the death of Alexander the Great in Babylon, 323 BC. After the naming of the two joint-kings, Alexander’s newborn infant son and his mentally challenged half-brother Philip Arridaios a bloody war begins between his generals over Alexander’s territories. Blood on the Moon follows the journey of the joint kings from Babylon to Macedon and the conflicts they encounter along the way.

Shadow of the Lion: The Fields of Hades, Volume Two, begins as the joint-kings arrive in Pella just as the Regent is dying and has named Polyperhcon his successor. This sets the Regent’s son, Kassandros, into a rage and he departs to Athens where he stirs up animosity between the Athenians and Macedonians. Meanwhile, the royal women vie for control of the throne. Alexander's 18-year-old niece, Adeia-Eurydiike, wife of Arridaios, leads her faction in a civil war against Olympias, Alexander's mother. The boy, Alexander IV (known by his Persian name, Iskander) tries to understand his role and struggles to survive. The story ends on a climax of a true Greek tragedy, ending Alexander's dynasty, and fulfilling the novel's theme of "How blind ambition and greed brought down a world power."

W. Ruth Kozak is a Canadian travel journalist with a strong interest in history and archaeology. A frequent traveller, Ruth lived for several years in Greece and instructs classes in travel journalism and creative writing for the Vancouver School Board. The novel was extensively researched in Greece, with the support of Classical scholars, the Greek Ministry of Culture, the Society of Macedonian Studies (Thessaloniki), the Finnish and Norwegian Institutes in Athens and with research undertaken in the Gennadius Library and the British Library in London

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