Événements passés

Screening of Canadian Movie

Date: 
Mercredi, avril 10, 2019 - 19:30 - 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Screening of the Canadian Movie “My Internship in Canada” (“Guibord s'en va-t-en guerre”) (2016; 1 hour 48 minutes; French with English subtitles)

Oscar-nominated Philippe Falardeau’s film is a satirical comedy about an independent MP from Northern Quebec (Patrick Huard) who unexpectedly finds himself holding the tie-breaking vote on whether Canada should go to war in the Middle East. In an attempt to settle the matter, he and his intern, a Haitian immigrant, embark on a grand tour of his constituency to evaluate public opinion.

 

In the context of National Canadian Film Day 2019

in collaboration with REEL CANADA and the Embassy of Canada

Lecture by Barbara N. Scarfo

Date: 
Mercredi, mars 27, 2019 - 19:30 - 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Barbara N. Scarfo (Homer and Dorothy Thompson Fellow, The Canadian Institute in Greece; Ph.D. candidate, Department of Classics, McMaster University) "Representations of Mothers and Infants in Funerary Commemoration: A Cross-Cultural Study"

In this paper I explore the depictions of mothers and infants on Classical Attic funerary monuments. By pairing mothers and infants, the monuments’ iconography helped to convey that the woman depicted had either achieved, or attempted to achieve, the goal that was set out for her by the Athenian polis and her oikos: she had become a mother to a legitimately recognized heir, an Athenian citizen. In certain cases, however, the absence of an inscription makes it more difficult to interpret the iconography. This paper will attempt to fill in the gaps that such ambiguities present. I will discuss the social and cultural circumstances that surrounded motherhood in Classical Athens and the expectations that were placed on women within their own oikoi and by the state, chiefly marrying and reproducing at a relatively young age. I will also analyze these monuments alongside ones from the Roman period that feature mothers and infants, a comparison to the Attic material that can help further our understanding of these monuments.

Lecture by Zisis Bonias & Jacques Perreault

Date: 
Mercredi, mars 6, 2019 - 19:30 - 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Drs Zisis Bonias (Director Emeritus, Hellenic Ministry of Culture) & Jacques Perreault (Professeur titulaire d'archéologie grecque, Université de Montréal), "Ancient Argilos: Shops, workshops and houses of the merchants’ quarter"

Since 2012, the Greek-Canadian synergasia at Ancient Argilos has been excavating a group of large buildings situated in the coastal area of the city. A few of these date to the mid 6th century B.C. and all remain occupied until the conquest of Philip II in 357 B.C. They attest to the economic dynamism of the Northern Greek colonies during the Archaic and Classical periods and give us valuable information on the urbanistic development of these cities.

Lecture by C. W. (Toph) Marshall

Date: 
Mercredi, février 20, 2019 - 19:30 - 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr C. W. (Toph) Marshall (Professor, Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies, University of British Columbia; Elizabeth A. Whitehead Visiting Professor, American School of Classical Studies at Athens), “Freddie Mercury and other Classical Poets”

This paper considers the examination of the reception of classical myth in selected modern poetry, with detailed examples from Zbigniew Herbert, Michael Ondaatje, and the rock group Queen. To what extent is the interpretation of antiquity an elite activity? how much class is in Classics? and what can classical reception do about it?

Lecture by Jere Wickens

Date: 
Mercredi, février 6, 2019 - 19:30 - 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr Jere Wickens (Department of Anthropology, Lawrence University and American School of Classical Studies at Athens), "The Archaeological Survey of the Bouros-Kastri Peninsula, Southern Euboia"

The Bouros-Kastri peninsula at the southeastern tip of Euboia was previously overlooked in the archaeological literature. The survey by the Southern Euboea Exploration Project, conducted under the aegis of the Canadian Institute in Greece, provides important information about fluctuations in long-term use and habitation of this agriculturally marginal part of the Karystia. After modest use during the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age, the peninsula was virtually abandoned until the Late Archaic–Early Classical period, followed by near desertion in the 3rd century BCE, a resurgence of activity in the Late Roman period, and modest use in Byzantine and Ottoman times. The talk will address the use of the peninsula in these periods, how its use was connected to that of the main urban center at Karystos, and how its small coastal inlets and its important port of Geraistos connected the peninsula and the greater Karystia to the political, economic, and cultural spheres of Athens and the broader region.

Lecture by Anastassios Anastassiadis

Date: 
Mercredi, janvier 16, 2019 - 19:30 - 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr Anastassios Anastassiadis (Associate Professor of History and Phrixos B. Papachristidis chair in Modern Greek Studies, Department of History and Classical Studies, McGill University), "Writing the global history of a forgotten army: The Allied armies of the Orient in WWI Greece"

More than 600,000 Entente soldiers from around the world were at one point camped in WWI Greece. Between 1916 and 1918, there were 250,000 of them stationed in and around Thessaloniki, a city of 170,000 inhabitants at the time.

However, the story of these Allied Armies has mostly been cast to oblivion, despite not only their role in terms of the outcome of the war but also their huge impact in terms of the biopolitics, meaning their contacts with the civilian population in a variety of forms: infrastructure, transportation, housing and food logistics, medical care and hygiene and even governance.
Based on a current multi-partner research project, this talk will address some of those points and also touch upon the reasons this presence disappeared from the collective memory, both in Greece and in certain Allied countries like France.

Lecture by Hallie Marshall

Date: 
Mercredi, décembre 5, 2018 - 19:30 - 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr Hallie Marshall (Assistant Professor, Department of Theatre & Film, University of British Columbia), "How to Shop for Books in late 5th-Century Athens"

The book trade in fifth century Athens is rarely discussed, and issues of literacy in classical Athens, and indeed in later periods, generally focus on questions of what portion of the population would have been literate, education and literacy, degrees of literacy, and the place and function of writing in Athens. This paper will explore our evidence for the selling and buying of books in late fifth-century Athens and argue that, in light of that evidence, we need to reframe our conception of what a book was for Greeks of this period.

Screening of Canadian Film

Date: 
Mercredi, novembre 21, 2018 - 19:30 - 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Screening of the Canadian Film "Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked the World" (2017; 1 hour 43 minutes; English)

This award-winning Canadian documentary profiles the impact of Indigenous musicians in Canada and the United States on the development of popular music (blues, jazz, folk, pop, rock, heavy metal). Artists profiled include Charley Patton, Mildred Bailey, Link Wray, Jimi Hendrix, Jesse Ed Davis, Stevie Salas, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Robbie Robertson, Randy Castillo, Taboo and others. The title of the film is a reference to the pioneering instrumental "Rumble", released in 1958 by the American group Link Wray & His Ray Men. The instrumental piece was very significant for many artists.

The film features many influential musicians who discuss the musical contributions of Indigenous artists, including commentaries from Quincy Jones, George Clinton, Taj Mahal, Martin Scorsese, John Trudell, Steven Tyler, Marky Ramone, Slash, Iggy Pop, Buddy Guy and others.

 

Lecture by Judith Fletcher

Date: 
Mercredi, octobre 31, 2018 - 19:30 - 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr Judith Fletcher (Professor, Department of History and Ancient Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University), "The haunted text: myths of the underworld in contemporary culture"

Stories of a visit to the realm of the dead and a return to the upper world are among the oldest narratives in European culture, beginning with Homer’s Odyssey and extending to contemporary fiction and art. Judith Fletcher examines a variety of different genres by twentieth- and twenty-first century authors and artists, including Salman Rushdie, Neil Gaiman, Elena Ferrante, and Anish Kapoor, who deal in various ways with the descent to Hades in literary fiction, comics, film, sculpture, and children’s culture. The analyses of these “haunted texts,” consider how their retellings relate to earlier versions of the mythical theme, including their ancient precedents by Homer and Vergil, but also to post-classical receptions of underworld narratives by authors such as Dante, Ezra Pound, and Joseph Conrad.  

Lecture by D. G. 'Josh' Beer

Date: 
Mercredi, octobre 17, 2018 - 19:30 - 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

D. G. 'Josh' Beer (Adjunct Professor, Department of Greek and Roman Studies, Carleton University), "The Athenian Plague and Eros as a Killer Virus in Euripides’ Hippolytus"

In 430-29 B.C. a plague devastated the Athenian population. Pericles, the statesman, died of it; Thucydides, our main historical witness, caught it but survived. In 428 Euripides presented his Hippolytus and won the tragic prize. In the play Aphrodite decides to kill Hippolytus by making his young stepmother Phaedra fall in love with him because he rejects her godhead. For the Greeks Eros (Love) was a madness that first attacked the eyes before assailing the mind. In both Thucydides’ account and Euripides’ play, the main recurring thematic term is nosos, disease. Of the plague some believed that it had a divine cause, others a natural explanation. The same division of opinions is expressed by the chorus of women in Hippolytus about Phaedra’s illness. Similarly, Aphrodite can be viewed in two ways; 1) as a vindictive deity; 2) as a force of nature in the form of Eros. I shall treat Eros metaphorically as a virus. Although only Phaedra suffers the full effects of Eros’ madness, the contagion spreads by means of Phaedra’s nurse, her main caregiver, and deranges the minds of the other characters. The primary visual image of Hippolytus is Phaedra’s sick-bed which morphs into the bier on which the dead queen is laid out. As a piece of theatre the bed/bier has a numinous existence that is as vital as that of the human characters.

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