Événements passés

2015 Biannual Graduate Student Conference of the Canadian Institute in Greece

Date: 
Vendredi, février 6, 2015 - 12:00 - Samedi, février 7, 2015 - 17:00
Location: 
University of Windsor (McPherson Lounge, Alumni Hall)
Event Description: 

2015 Biannual Graduate Student Conference of the Canadian Institute in Greece: “Reproduction and Repurposing in Antiquity”

Dr. Timothy Winters, Professor of Classics at Austin Peay State University and the current Gertrude Smith Professor at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, will deliver a keynote talk on the evening of Friday 6 February on the archaeology and history of the island of Salamis and his research there, titled: ‘“There’s Nothing Out There”: A Survey of the Archaeological Sites on the Island of Salamis’.

Tina Ross (MA, University of Victoria), current archaeological illustrator and publication artist at projects such as Mitrou, Pylos, Eleon, Kenchreai, and Aigeira will be conducting a professional workshop on drawing archaeological ceramics and understanding pot sherds (http://www.tinaross.ca/archaeologicalillustrationworkshopinfo ross.pdf).  There are still a few places available in the two sessions of 4 hours each, limited to 10 persons per session.  Interested parties should reserve their place as soon as possible by contacting conference coordinator, Jeff Banks (banksjn@mail.uc.edu).  One session will be held in the afternoon of Friday 6 February, the second on Saturday 7 February.  There is a nominal fee to reserve a place at this professional workshop.  Illustration instruments will be available to the participants and they will have the opportunity to handle and engage with actual antiquities.

 

Friday 6 February 2015      

12:00–4:00 PM           Tina Ross: Archaeological Illustration Workshop (Session I)

4:15–5:00 PM             Reception                                     

5:00–6:15 PM             Opening remarks

Keynote Address, Tim Winters:

“There’s Nothing Out There”: A Survey of the Archaeological Sites on the Island of Salamis

 

Saturday 7 February 2015

12:00–4:00 PM           Tina Ross: Archaeological Illustration Workshop (Session II)

 

10:00 AM                    Krista Banks, Wilfrid Laurier University

                                    Repurposing Akrotiri: The Minoanization of a Cycladic Town

10:30 AM                    Rebecca Bennett and Wendy Chennette, Wilfrid Laurier University

Minoan Metamorphosis: Repurposing at Palaikastro

11:00 AM                    Sarah Schofield-Mansur, Brandeis University

From Birth to Burial: Connections to Fertility and Maternity in the IntramuralInfant Container Burials of Late Bronze Age Crete

1:00 PM                      Victoria Newson, Wilfrid Laurier University

                                    The Non-Locals of Grave Circle A

1:30 PM                      Rachel Dewan, University of Oxford

Recycled Religion: The Mycenaean Adoption, Integration, and Manipulation of Minoan Religious Symbols and Practices

2:00 PM                      Anna Belza, Brandeis University

Reexamining the Philistine Question: Continuity or Imitation of Mycenaean Material Culture?

3:00 PM                      Jill Simmons, University of Georgia

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Wine-Dark: The πολυφλοίσβοιο θαλάσσης from Homer to Hesiod

3:30 PM                      Gino Canlas, University of Alberta

Approaches to Monumentality in Thessalian Religion

4:00 PM                      Caitlin Diddams and James Gawley, University at Buffalo SUNY

Quasi Anhelans: Orality and Intertextuality between Cicero De Oratore 3.41 and Augustine De Doctrina Christiana 4.13

4:30 PM                      Closing Remarks

Lecture by Hara Papatheodorou

Date: 
Mercredi, février 4, 2015 - 19:30 - 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Hara Papatheodorou (Emeritus Professor of Art History and the Visual Arts, The American College of Greece), “Angels: The Bureaucracy of the Divine”

The lecture will discuss the primary significance of angels, which lies not in who or what they are but in what they do – communicate God’s word to humankind.  Serving as heavenly messengers, guardians or intermediaries, angels represent the human belief in their power of meditating with the Divine – την ιερή μεσιτεία

They observe a strict hierarchical system based on the dualism of good and evil, which brings the Cosmos into being. Tracing their origin to the Assyro-Babylonian sun cult lamassu (winged bulls), the Christian angel will retain similar elements and functions, such as the Cherubim and Seraphim with their six pairs of wings and many eyes, guarding the throne of the Pantokrator (Almighty God) painted on the dome of the Greek Orthodox churches, or depicted on the conches of the dome.

The Judaic angelolatry soon will be enhanced by the Platonic philosophy of ideal Beauty (Καλόν κι αγαθόν), and the angel will function as psycho pomp leading man to the Apotheosis and salvation of his soul. Hence the early representations of angels in art carry wreaths with Christ’s initial within, indicating worship of the Resurrection.

Then, the theological writings by Pseudo-Dionysios Areopagitis influenced by the Neo-Platonists (Plotinos and Proklos) will create a static universe, which will obey the One, who in his turn will illuminate the nine Celestial Hierarchies of angels as his functionaries. Thus, the order of Cosmos becomes an ideal ideology for a feudal society.

Using comparative works of art, the lecture will illuminate the various roles of the angels as functionaries of the Divine via works of art.

Lecture by David W. Rupp

Date: 
Jeudi, janvier 29, 2015 - 19:30 - 20:30
Location: 
University of Victoria (Clearihue A212)
Event Description: 

David W. Rupp, "Canadians Take the Field: Over 30 Years of Archaeological Discoveries by the Canadian Institute in Greece"

Lecture by David W. Rupp

Date: 
Lundi, janvier 26, 2015 - 19:30 - 20:30
Location: 
Hellenic Community Centre, Vancouver
Event Description: 

David W. Rupp, "Canadians Take the Field: Over 30 Years of Archaeological Discoveries by the Canadian Institute in Greece"

Lecture by David W. Rupp

Date: 
Vendredi, janvier 23, 2015 - 15:00 - 16:00
Location: 
University of Calgary (Department of Classics and Religion)
Event Description: 

Prof. David W. Rupp (Director, CIG), "Canadians Take the Field: Over 30 Years of Archaeological Discoveries by the Canadian Institute in Greece"

Lecture by David W. Rupp

Date: 
Jeudi, janvier 22, 2015 - 19:00 - 20:00
Location: 
University of Alberta
Event Description: 

Prof. David W. Rupp (Director, CIG), "Canadians Take the Field: Over 30 Years of Archaeological Discoveries by the Canadian Institute in Greece"

Lecture by David W. Rupp

Date: 
Dimanche, janvier 18, 2015 - 15:00 - 16:00
Location: 
University of Manitoba (237 University College)
Event Description: 

Prof. David W. Rupp (Director, CIG), "Canadians Take the Field: Over 30 Years of Archaeological Discoveries by the Canadian Institute in Greece"

NEW YEAR

Date: 
Lundi, décembre 29, 2014 (Jour entier) - Vendredi, janvier 2, 2015 (Jour entier)
Event Description: 

The Institute will remain closed this week for New Year.

Type: 

CHRISTMAS

Date: 
Lundi, décembre 22, 2014 (Jour entier) - Vendredi, décembre 26, 2014 (Jour entier)
Event Description: 

The Institute will remain closed this week for Christmas.

Type: 

Lecture by Athanasios Gekas, Christopher Grafos & Kali Petropoulos

Date: 
Mercredi, décembre 10, 2014 - 19:30 - 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Lecture by Athanasios Gekas, Christopher Grafos & Kali Petropoulos (York University: Co-Founders/Directors of the Greek Canadian History Project (GCHP) & Public Relations Coordinator of the GCHP), Memory and Migration: A Glimpse of Greek Immigrant Life in Toronto, 1864 - Present

The construction of ethnic communities in North America is a process of negotiation. What remnants of a migrant’s past are palatable to the host society and what aspects of the homeland survive the transatlantic voyage? This presentation examines these questions through a historical lens and chronicles the evolution of Greek identity in Toronto, Canada.

The lecture will be preceded by a brief presentation of the Greek Canadian History Project / Πρόγραμμα Έρευνας Ελληνο-Καναδικής Ιστορίας (http://archives.library.yorku.ca/gchp/), which aims to illuminate the history and events that have shaped the experiences of Greek immigrants in Canada and their descendants.

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