Past Events

The Canadian Institute in Greece Biannual Student Conference

Date: 
Friday, January 27, 2017 - 18:00 to Saturday, January 28, 2017 - 16:00
Location: 
Department of History and Classics, University of Alberta, Edmonton
Event Description: 

The 2017 Canadian Institute in Greece Biannual Student Conference: "Regional Identitites in the Greek World"

 

Keynote Lecturer: Craig Hardiman (University of Waterloo), "Micro-Regionalism, Macro-Regionalism and a Hellenistic Artistic Koine" 

The Hellenistic period is almost defined as non-Regional. The term, coined in the 19th c. means "to make Greek" and the subsequent history of the discipline suggests a cultural koine (commonality) that was consciously spread by Alexander the Great and supported by his successors. And yet the Hellenistic period was also a multi-cultural world where these very successors, their poets and artists, had to communicate to differing populations and were exposed to new ideas and traditions that were very non-Greek. Even within the established "old" Greek world, many scholars are examining regional differentiation and specializing in order to distinguish their region from a "generic' Greek experience. The work that the University of Alberta has done in Thessaly through the Canadian Institute in Greece is but one such example. But how far can regionalism as a methodology take us? Are we discarding a sense of the culturally communal, the very basis for the discipline of Classical Studies, by focussing on small regions and (perhaps) small differences? This paper will explore regionalism within the context of Hellenistic material (especially artistic) production in order to make us more aware of the issues surrounding regionalism as a methodology.

Location: University of Alberta, Business 1-5

Time: 6:00pm, Jan 27

 

All panels will be held on Jan 28, Tory 2-58

Panel 1: Studies on Material Culture (Chair: Margriet Haagsma)

10:00-10:30: Katherine Bishop, "The Interwoven Effects of Regionalism in Achaia Phthiotis"

10:30-11:00: Karey Thomson, "Utilitarian Pottery and Connectivity in the Late Hellenistic World: On Finding Cooking Pots from Asia Minor and Achaia Phthiotis"

11:00-11:30: Rachel DeGraaf, "Paximadi’s Past: Work on Early Canadian Excavations near Karystos in Euboia"

11:30 – 1:00 LUNCH

Panel 2: Dealing with the Written Sources (Chair: Dr Selina Stewart)

1:00 – 1:30: Jilene Tobin, "Plato’s Theory of Forms"

1:30-2:00: Adam Wiznura, "The Ambiguity of the Status of the Penestai in Thessaly"

2:00 – 2:30: Chris Lougheed, "Symmachus as Socrates: Greek and Roman in the Self-Presentation of a Late Roman Senator"

Panel 3: History and Archaeology of Greek Identity (Chair: Dr Frances Pownall)

2:30-3:00: Toryn Suddaby, "Behind the Artemis Orthia Masks: Engendering Spartan Identity"

3:00-3:30: Gino Canlas, "Roman Perceptions of Thessalian Identities: Philia and Pythion"

3:30-4:00: Kristen Millions, "The Invention of Minoan Religion: Implications of Modern Analyses on the Identities of Ancient Peoples"

Lecture by Maria Liston

Date: 
Wednesday, January 25, 2017 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Lecture by Dr Maria Liston (Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Waterloo), “Murder in the Agora: Violent Death and Illicit Burial in Ancient Athens”

Violent crime and homicides are not a problem limited to the modern world alone, and the ancient city of Athens experienced similar events throughout antiquity. A recent study of all the human skeletons found in wells excavated by the American Excavations in the Athenian Agora has found that many of these individuals died violently. Some of the dead, including women and children, appear to be associated with the sack of Athens by the Herulians, a Gothic tribe who invaded Greece in AD 267. Other skeletons, found in wells ranging in date from the Neolithic to late antiquity, appear to be victims of individual attacks. These skeletons exhibit multiple indications of trauma, and appear to be murder victims hidden in the depths of wells, presumably conveniently located near the scene of the crime. This lecture examines the evidence for these ancient “cold case” crimes in Ancient Athens.

Lecture by Daryn Lehoux

Date: 
Sunday, January 22, 2017 -
14:00 to 15:00
Location: 
Hellenic Community Centre, 1315 Prince of Wales Drive, Ottawa
Event Description: 

Daryn Lehoux PhD (Queen’s University Kingston),  "The Antikythera Mechanism: An Ancient Astronomical Computer"

Professor Lehoux, author of Astronomy, Weather, and Calendars in the Ancient World (Cambridge University Press, 2007), will look at the history of the world’s oldest computer, its discovery and how its secrets were revealed.

Lecture by Mark D. Hammond

Date: 
Wednesday, December 7, 2016 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr Mark D. Hammond (Elisabeth Alföldi-Rosenbaum Fellow, The Canadian Institute in Greece), “From the Kiln to the Grave: The Early Excavations of a Late Roman Cemetery on the Hill of Zeus, Corinth”

In 1933 the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, attempting to locate a temple dedicated to Zeus, dug four trial trenches on the so-called “Hill of Zeus” in Corinth. Instead, they uncovered part of a large Early Christian cemetery to the west of the Asklepieion. The results of these excavations were never published but a new study aims to contextualize this material both within the cemetery and Late Roman Corinth generally. Although working with an 83-year old excavation poses various challenges, the first stage of the study, focused on the ceramics recovered from the graves, is revealing important results. Detailed examination of the vessels themselves is providing insight into the manufacturing practices that produced them as well as their intended (and unintended) use at the grave, while careful consideration of the fabrics together with comparative analyses place the vessels within pre-established local, regional, and long-distance networks and offer some refinements to the chronology of the cemetery.

Screening of Canadian Movie

Date: 
Wednesday, November 30, 2016 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Screening of the Canadian Movie, “Gunless” (2010; 1 hour 29 minutes; English)

When notorious American gunslinger, The Montana Kid, staggers into the tiny Canadian hamlet of Barclay's Brush, life for the town's 17 inhabitants is about to get exciting. The Kid immediately gets into an unfortunate altercation with Jack, the town's surly blacksmith, which leads to The Kid 'calling him out' for some good old frontier justice - a showdown. But in a place totally ill prepared to deal with a classic gun fight and without a single working pistol to be found, adhering to the code of the American Wild West may prove difficult. Not able to let go of the 'code', The Kid remains stuck in Barclay's Brush, getting drawn into a strange world of eccentric rituals and characters; among them Jane, a smart sassy woman who becomes his only hope of finding a way out...or perhaps his only reason for staying....

Lecture by John Serrati

Date: 
Sunday, November 20, 2016 -
14:00 to 15:00
Location: 
303 Patterson Hall, Carleton University, Ottawa
Event Description: 

John Serrati (University of Ottawa), "Hoplites and Heroes: Homer on the Battlefields of Classical Greece"

Here, the works of Homer play a crucial role; marching to war, the hoplites undoubtedly saw Achilles, Hektor, and Agamemnon in themselves.  Just as these heroes of the past had competed with each other for battle honours, so too did the men of the phalanx seek to outdo each other as well as to best their opponents.  The works of Homer thus played a key role in the reinforcement of Greek ag​n​o​stic culture, and served as the prime motivation for Greeks to throw themselves into the thick of combat.

Lecture by Žarko Tankosić

Date: 
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr Žarko Tankosić (Higher Executive Officer, The Norwegian Institute at Athens), “A Community at the Crossroads: Prehistoric Southern Euboea and the Aegean in Light of New Survey Data”

In my talk I focus on southern Euboea (Karystia), which is a part of the Aegean that has been largely overlooked in models put in place to explain the prehistoric Aegean island colonization and maritime interactions. The data show a lively area, whose inhabitants were fully immersed into the prehistoric maritime koine, at least during the Final Neolithic and the Early Bronze Age. They also paint a picture of the region at the crossroads, bridging the insular world of the Cyclades and the Greek mainland.

Here, I outline several issues plaguing our understanding of the Karystia’s place in the prehistoric Aegean and address them using evidence from the area. In the process, I also engage with broader topics, such as identity, community, insularity, and connectivity Moreover, I present new results from the recently completed Norwegian survey project in the Karystia.

Lecture by Jacob Heywood

Date: 
Wednesday, November 2, 2016 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Jacob Heywood (Ph.D. Candidate, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, The University of Melbourne), Cretan Larnakes: Towards an Understanding of Syntax in Late Minoan III Funerary Iconography

The Late Minoan III period on Crete (ca. 1430-1100 BCE) was characterised by substantial socio-political discontinuity and island-wide change following the decline of the Minoan palaces. Alongside an array of other developments in material culture, the period was marked by a clear shift in mortuary practices, which included the expansion and re-invention of the pre-existing tradition of burial in clay funerary containers known as ‘larnakes’. Unlike funerary receptacles from earlier periods, many LM III larnakes are adorned with rich painted compositions. These draw upon a wide range of floral, faunal, cultic, and geometric motifs, many of which were already well-established in Cretan iconographic traditions. Despite having received a great deal of scholarly attention, the exact symbolic significance of larnax decoration remains difficult to interpret, particularly given its typically abstract nature.   

This talk investigates the value of a systematic ‘syntactic’ approach to larnax decoration as a means of establishing a more solid foundation for its iconographic interpretation. The identification and quantification of the specific symbolic associations and patterns characterising the use of individual larnax motifs may permit a more thorough understanding of the fundamental visual structures through which meaning was generated. A greater knowledge of this syntax can aid ongoing attempts to assess the possible funerary meanings associated with LM III art, as well highlight in more detail the relationship between the sudden development of larnax iconography and the processes of socio-cultural change occurring on Crete during this period. In particular, an analysis of syntactic patterns can assist in demonstrating how familiar Minoan symbols- for example the horns of consecration and double axe- were adapted to serve new mortuary functions as larnax adornments, and the extent to which this use is consistent with that of both earlier and other contemporary artistic contexts.

Book Presentation/Reading by W. Ruth Kozak

Date: 
Wednesday, October 19, 2016 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Book Presentation/Reading by W. Ruth Kozak, “Shadow of the Lion: The Fields of Hades”

Shadow of the Lion: The Fields of Hades is Volume Two of an epic story set in the aftermath of the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the bloody Wars of Succession which follow. W. Ruth Kozak’s novel seethes with conflict and dramatic tension as the Successors begin to battle over Alexander's territories.  The joint-kings arrive in Pella just as the Regent is dying and has named Polyperhcon his successor. This sets Kassandros into a rage and he departs to Athens where he stirs up animosity between the Athenians and Macedonians and tries to enlist support from some of the Successors. Meanwhile, the royal women vie for control of the throne. Alexander's 18-year-old niece, Adeia-Eurydiike, wife of  Arridaios, leads her faction in a civil war against Olympias, Alexander's mother. Caught up in the strife and palace intrigues, Roxana tries to protect her son.  The boy, Alexander IV (known by his Persian name, Iskader, tries to understand his role and struggles to survive. The story ends on a climax of a true Greek tragedy, the end of Alexander's dynasty, fulfilling the novel's theme of "How blind ambition and greed brought down a world power."

W. Ruth Kozak is a Canadian travel journalist with a strong interest in history and archaeology. A frequent traveller, Ruth lived for several years in Greece and instructs classes in travel journalism and creative writing for the Vancouver School Board. The novel was extensively researched in Greece, with the support of Classical scholars, the Greek Ministry of Culture, the Society of Macedonian Studies (Thessaloniki), the Finnish and Norwegian Institutes in Athens and with research undertaken in the Gennadius Library and the British Library in London

Lecture by Thomas G. Chondros

Date: 
Friday, October 7, 2016 -
19:00 to 20:00
Location: 
Hellenic Community Meeting and Reception Centre, Ottawa
Event Description: 

Thomas G. Chondros (University of Patras), "Reconstructing the Trojan Horse"

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