Past Events

Screening of a Canadian Movie

Date: 
Wednesday, December 9, 2015 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
The Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Screening of the Canadian Movie, “The Grand Seduction” (2013; 1 hour 53 minutes; English)

Residents of a small fishing community in Newfoundland must convince a young doctor to become their full-time physician by any means necessary.

Directed by the excellent Canadian actor and filmmaker Don McKellar (his first feature in over a decade), and starring Brendan Gleeson as the main character, Murray, this is a film filled with astute details, striking scenery, and well-rounded characters living in reality.

The town has been on the verge of luring a petroleum byproducts factory for years, but hasn't been able to close the deal because the company requires that the town have at least 250 adult inhabitants and a full-time doctor with hospital privileges. Murray hears about a young American physician who's been waylaid on his way home to Los Angeles from a cricket tournament after airport security discovered cocaine in his luggage. The doc has to spend a month in Canada until his case is resolved. Murray gets him to spend his time in the town, figuring that if they can all join forces to make the place seem like an Eden built for Lewis' personal needs, he'll decide to stay, and they'll be able to land the factory.

Lecture by Gerald P. Schaus

Date: 
Wednesday, November 18, 2015 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
The Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Gerald P. Schaus (Professor, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University), "Laconia and East Greece: Cultural Exchange in the Archaic Period"

This paper examines some cultural connections between Laconia and East Greece, including Lydian Sardis, in the Archaic Period, focusing on similarities in pottery decoration, but more broadly considering literary evidence and a variety of other archaeological sources.  Laconian products and influences found in East Greece are examined in light of evidence for Ionians visiting and working in Laconia.

Book Presentation/Reading by W. Ruth Kozak

Date: 
Wednesday, October 7, 2015 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
The Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Book Presentation/Reading by W. Ruth Kozak, “Shadow of the Lion: Blood on the Moon”

Taking fifteen years to write, Shadow of the Lion: Blood on the Moon is Volume One of an epic story set in the aftermath of the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the bloody Wars of Succession which follows as W. Ruth Kozak’s debut literary novel chronicles the journey of the newly appointed joint-kings, Alexander’s half-brother Philip Arridaios and his infant son, Iskander (Alexander IV).

W. Ruth Kozak is a Canadian travel journalist with a strong interest in history and archaeology. A frequent traveller, Ruth lived for several years in Greece and instructs classes in travel journalism and creative writing for the Vancouver School Board.

The novel was extensively researched in Greece, with the support of Classical scholars, the Greek Ministry of Culture, the Society of Macedonian Studies (Thessaloniki), the Finnish and Norwegian Institutes in Athens and with research undertaken in the Gennadius Library and the British Library in London.

Canadian Institute Open Meeting & Tristan Carter

Date: 
Wednesday, May 13, 2015 -
19:00 to 20:30
Location: 
Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene, Parthenonos 14-16
Event Description: 

David W. Rupp (Director), "The activities of the Institute 2014-2015"

Tristan Carter (McMaster University), "The Stélida Naxos Archaeological Project: Early Humans in the Aegean"

            Until relatively recently the Cycladic islands were not believed to have been colonised by humans until farmer arrived in the Late Neolithic, some 7000 years ago. This long-held view is now being reconfigured through the discovery by Greek archaeologists of a well-dated Mesolithic (late hunter-gatherer) village on Kythnos, and claimed Mesolithic – Middle Palaeolithic activities at Stélida on Naxos.

            This talk details the most recent work at Stélida, a two-year survey dedicated to mapping this chert source and its prehistoric stone tool workshops. We detail how the quarry was clearly being exploited from the Lower Palaeolithic (likely by Homo heidelbergensis), followed by major stone working in the Middle Palaeolithic (Neanderthals), and then through the earlier Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic (Homo sapiens), i.e. a history of (intermittent) usage that spans at least 300,000 – 9,000 years ago. The discovery of such early material on Naxos has potentially major significance for how we view the earliest peopling of Europe. With recent sea-level reconstructions suggesting a landbridge between Anatolia and the southern Greek mainland, Stélida may provide evidence that the Aegean represented a thoroughfare for early human migrations, rather than the barrier it was long considered to be.

Lecture by Nicholas Blackwell

Date: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr. Nicholas Blackwell (Assistant Director, The American School of Classical Studies at Athens), “Competitive and Emulative Mortuary Behavior on Early Iron Age Cyprus”

Lecture by Ειρήνη Λεγάκη

Date: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2015 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Ειρήνη Λεγάκη (Αρχαιολόγος της Εφορείας Αρχαιοτήτων Κυκλάδων, Υπ.Πο.Α.), “Νεώτερα αρχαιολογικά δεδομένα για τη Νάξο και τις Μικρές Κυκλάδες”

Τα τελευταία χρόνια έχουν έρθει στο φως στη Νάξο και τις Μικρές Κυκλάδες νέα στοιχεία είτε για άγνωστες έως σήμερα θέσεις προϊστορικών και ιστορικών χρόνων, είτε για ήδη γνωστές, τα οποία συνεισφέρουν στη γνώση για την προϊστορία και την ιστορία των παραπάνω νησιωτικών περιοχών. Κάποια δε από τα στοιχεία αυτά ενδεχομένως επαναπροσδιορίζουν τη θέση ορισμένων από τα παραπάνω νησιά στον ευρύτερο χώρο της Ευρωπαϊκής Προϊστορίας.

Lecture by Αλεξάνδρα Χαραμή

Date: 
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Δρ. Αλεξάνδρα Χαραμή (Προϊσταμένη της Εφορείας Αρχαιοτήτων Βοιωτίας, Υπ.Πο.Α.), “Η Μετά-Αλεξάνδρεια περίοδος στην πόλη των Θηβών μέσα από την μαρτυρία των νεκροταφείων της”

Η μακρά περίοδος από την καταστροφή της πόλεως των Θηβών από τον Μέγα Αλέξανδρο (335 π.Χ.) μέχρι και τη Ρωμαιοκρατία, ελάχιστα είχε απασχολήσει την επιστημονική έρευνα, παρά το πλήθος των ευρημάτων από τις αρχές του 20ου αιώνα μέχρι σήμερα, τα οποία προέρχονται κυρίως από την ανασκαφή τμημάτων νεκροταφείων.

Η παρουσίαση των αποτελεσμάτων της μελέτης των ευρημάτων ελληνιστικών τάφων του Βορειοανατολικού νεκροταφείου των Θηβών, ανασυνθέτει αυτήν την ελάχιστα γνωστή, μέχρι σήμερα, περίοδο κατά τις διάφορες φάσεις της.

Lecture by Lana Radloff

Date: 
Wednesday, March 11, 2015 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Lana Radloff (Homer and Dorothy Thompson Fellow, The Canadian Institute in Greece; Ph.D. candidate, Department of Classics, University at Buffalo, S.U.N.Y.), “Ideology, Identity, and Power: Harbor-Agora Connectivity at Hellenistic Miletos”

Sacked by the Persians in 494 BC, Miletos was rebuilt on a regular orthogonal grid, prospering once again in the 4th century BCE and Hellenistic period, when extensive building took place around the Lion Harbor and North and South Markets. Coinciding with the rise of the Macedonian kingdoms after the death of Alexander the Great, the fact that building focused on harbors and marketplaces demonstrates their fundamental role as physical spaces. In order to establish Asiatic cities as military and economic power bases, Alexander’s successors exchanged royal patronage for civic goodwill at cities such as Miletos. Consequently, urban environments became a mechanism for negotiating socio-political relationships between the Hellenistic kings and local inhabitants.

In terms of connectivity, I view the agora and harbor as liminal spaces that function as nodes within the ‘maritime cultural landscape,’ connected with each other, the broader settlement, sea, and outside world. Drawing on scholarship from urbanism, the maritime environment, and social space theory, I examine the harbor-city matrix of Hellenistic Miletos in order to explore the physical relationship between the agoras at Miletos and the role its harbors played as nodes of connectivity and separation in the negotiation of socio-political relationships within the city and between the city and the outside world.

Lecture by Calla McNamee

Date: 
Wednesday, March 4, 2015 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Calla McNamee (Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Calgary), “Grounded in Practice: Changing Bronze Age Subsistence at the Site of Mitrou, East Lokris”

Until recently, the reconstruction of subsistence practices in the Aegean has relied heavily on the recovery and identification of charred macrobotanical remains from site contexts, typically from storerooms. This type of reconstruction provides us with an understanding of the foods present at an archaeological site, but it is heavily dependent on specific circumstances of preservation and does not inform us directly about food processing or consumption. This lecture is focused on the use of another type of evidence: starch grains and phytoliths. Commonly preserved on grinding implements, these microbotanical remains provide a means to identify not only which staple resources were processed at a site, but also to reconstruct practices employed in the preparation of these resources.

This talk provides a background on microbotanical residue analysis and presents the results of a pilot study of starch grains and phytoliths extracted from ground stone artifacts recovered from the prehistoric site of Mitrou, East Lokris. The occupation of Mitrou spans from the Final Neolithic to the Late Protogeometric period and provides an uninterrupted archaeological sequence that encompasses the rise and decline of Mycenaean palatial society and the subsequent transition from urban centre to rural community. The pilot study of Mitrou ground stone tools demonstrates the ability of starch grain and phytolith research to enhance our understanding of not only Bronze Age resource processing, but the relationship between subsistence practices and socio-political organization.

2015 Biannual Graduate Student Conference of the Canadian Institute in Greece

Date: 
Friday, February 6, 2015 - 12:00 to Saturday, February 7, 2015 - 17:00
Location: 
University of Windsor (McPherson Lounge, Alumni Hall)
Event Description: 

2015 Biannual Graduate Student Conference of the Canadian Institute in Greece: “Reproduction and Repurposing in Antiquity”

Dr. Timothy Winters, Professor of Classics at Austin Peay State University and the current Gertrude Smith Professor at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, will deliver a keynote talk on the evening of Friday 6 February on the archaeology and history of the island of Salamis and his research there, titled: ‘“There’s Nothing Out There”: A Survey of the Archaeological Sites on the Island of Salamis’.

Tina Ross (MA, University of Victoria), current archaeological illustrator and publication artist at projects such as Mitrou, Pylos, Eleon, Kenchreai, and Aigeira will be conducting a professional workshop on drawing archaeological ceramics and understanding pot sherds (http://www.tinaross.ca/archaeologicalillustrationworkshopinfo ross.pdf).  There are still a few places available in the two sessions of 4 hours each, limited to 10 persons per session.  Interested parties should reserve their place as soon as possible by contacting conference coordinator, Jeff Banks (banksjn@mail.uc.edu).  One session will be held in the afternoon of Friday 6 February, the second on Saturday 7 February.  There is a nominal fee to reserve a place at this professional workshop.  Illustration instruments will be available to the participants and they will have the opportunity to handle and engage with actual antiquities.

 

Friday 6 February 2015      

12:00–4:00 PM           Tina Ross: Archaeological Illustration Workshop (Session I)

4:15–5:00 PM             Reception                                     

5:00–6:15 PM             Opening remarks

Keynote Address, Tim Winters:

“There’s Nothing Out There”: A Survey of the Archaeological Sites on the Island of Salamis

 

Saturday 7 February 2015

12:00–4:00 PM           Tina Ross: Archaeological Illustration Workshop (Session II)

 

10:00 AM                    Krista Banks, Wilfrid Laurier University

                                    Repurposing Akrotiri: The Minoanization of a Cycladic Town

10:30 AM                    Rebecca Bennett and Wendy Chennette, Wilfrid Laurier University

Minoan Metamorphosis: Repurposing at Palaikastro

11:00 AM                    Sarah Schofield-Mansur, Brandeis University

From Birth to Burial: Connections to Fertility and Maternity in the IntramuralInfant Container Burials of Late Bronze Age Crete

1:00 PM                      Victoria Newson, Wilfrid Laurier University

                                    The Non-Locals of Grave Circle A

1:30 PM                      Rachel Dewan, University of Oxford

Recycled Religion: The Mycenaean Adoption, Integration, and Manipulation of Minoan Religious Symbols and Practices

2:00 PM                      Anna Belza, Brandeis University

Reexamining the Philistine Question: Continuity or Imitation of Mycenaean Material Culture?

3:00 PM                      Jill Simmons, University of Georgia

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Wine-Dark: The πολυφλοίσβοιο θαλάσσης from Homer to Hesiod

3:30 PM                      Gino Canlas, University of Alberta

Approaches to Monumentality in Thessalian Religion

4:00 PM                      Caitlin Diddams and James Gawley, University at Buffalo SUNY

Quasi Anhelans: Orality and Intertextuality between Cicero De Oratore 3.41 and Augustine De Doctrina Christiana 4.13

4:30 PM                      Closing Remarks

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