Past Events

Lecture by Metaxia Tsipopoulou

Date: 
Wednesday, March 9, 2016 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Metaxia Tsipopoulou (Director Emerita, Hellenic Ministry of Culture), “«Ce qui donne un sens à la vie donne un sens à la mort» (Antoine de Saint Exupéry). The Pre- and Proto-palatial cemetery at Petras, Siteia. (ca 2800-1900 BC)”

At Petras, Siteia, in Northeastern Crete, the archaeological sites extend over two neighbouring hills. Excavations, directed by Metaxia Tsipopoulou, started in 1985 and are still in progress. On Hill I an important Minoan palace and parts of a settlement occupied from the Early Minoan II to the Late Minoan IIIB periods were excavated. On Hill II (or Kephala), a Final Neolithic IV and Early Minoan I settlement, another settlement dated to the Late Minoan III and an extensive Early Minoan I to Middle Minoan II cemetery are being excavated.

Petras played a leading role in the cultural, economic, and religious networks not only of Crete, but also of the Aegean, and beyond, in the Eastern Mediterranean. The cemetery comprises house-tombs with up to 10 rooms measuring between 50-90m, each of them used by an extended elite family.  To date 14 house tombs have been excavated and there is a possibility of more. The tombs were unplundered and this fact combined with the modern methods of the excavation, documentation and study by an international group of experts offer a unique opportunity to understand social status and competition in a Pre- and Protopalatial society.

Lecture by Florence Liard

Date: 
Wednesday, February 24, 2016 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Florence Liard (Postdoctoral Researcher, Université Libre de Bruxelles), “The knowledge, skills and traditions of ancient potters: Exploring the principles and potential of ceramic petrology in Greek archaeology”

The detection of markers of “crisis”, which can be broadly defined as a deep social disruption followed by restructuring, is a research theme that has become popular in Greek archaeology. It has often been researched through a typo-stylistic study of decorated pottery, with the aim of reconstructing historical landmarks of past civilizations.

This lecture investigates the use of ceramic petrology over the past 35 years, through a comparative account of studies carried out in protohistoric (Late Bronze Age Crete) as well as historical contexts (Late Byzantine and Frankish Greece). Advances in sampling strategies and instrumentation are discussed in relation to the evolution of wider theoretical frameworks and research inquiries in the discipline of archaeology.

Dr. Liard will discuss how and to what extent ceramic petrology, albeit at the dawn of its development in this context, can provide further understanding of the phenomena of crisis and their local outcome on past populations’ lifestyles, through a detailed study of technological traditions associated with pottery production and use.

Lecture by Brendan Burke

Date: 
Wednesday, February 10, 2016 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Brendan Burke (Associate Professor, Department of Greek & Roman Studies, University of Victoria), “Myths of Wealth in the Ancient World: Ex Oriente Lux”

Many foreigners, according to Greek sources, had a reputation for astronomical wealth: Priam, Midas, Croesus, Maussolos are just a few. Legends surrounding these individuals were a great source of fascination. What is often surprising to modern audiences, however, is that most of these figures from Greek and Roman legend were powerful, historical rulers. It is also often assumed that incredible wealth was in some ways corrupting or debilitating to those who held it. This lecture examines these stories and looks at the archaeological evidence for such fabulous wealth in order to distinguish myth from history.

Lecture by Dimitri Nakassis

Date: 
Wednesday, January 27, 2016 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dimitri Nakassis (Associate Professor, Department of Classics, University of Toronto), “From types to relations: complicating the economic history of the Greek Late Bronze Age”

Research into the early Greek economy has largely relied on static types built from the top down on the basis of analogical and textual evidence, despite the rapid growth in the archaeological evidence over the past fifty years. This paper argues, through analysis of the internal organization of the palatial economy and its external exchange relations, that conventional models do not adequately explain the economy of the Greek Late Bronze Age. It is usually thought, on analogy with the Near East, that the economic roles of the Mycenaean palaces were redistributive as to staples and reciprocal as to wealth, yet the evidence is much less clear than has been thought. Internally, the palaces made use of a variety of means to acquire goods, including market-type exchanges, and it is probable that interregional trade was mainly coordinated by elite intermediaries.

Screening of a Canadian Movie

Date: 
Wednesday, December 9, 2015 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
The Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Screening of the Canadian Movie, “The Grand Seduction” (2013; 1 hour 53 minutes; English)

Residents of a small fishing community in Newfoundland must convince a young doctor to become their full-time physician by any means necessary.

Directed by the excellent Canadian actor and filmmaker Don McKellar (his first feature in over a decade), and starring Brendan Gleeson as the main character, Murray, this is a film filled with astute details, striking scenery, and well-rounded characters living in reality.

The town has been on the verge of luring a petroleum byproducts factory for years, but hasn't been able to close the deal because the company requires that the town have at least 250 adult inhabitants and a full-time doctor with hospital privileges. Murray hears about a young American physician who's been waylaid on his way home to Los Angeles from a cricket tournament after airport security discovered cocaine in his luggage. The doc has to spend a month in Canada until his case is resolved. Murray gets him to spend his time in the town, figuring that if they can all join forces to make the place seem like an Eden built for Lewis' personal needs, he'll decide to stay, and they'll be able to land the factory.

Lecture by Gerald P. Schaus

Date: 
Wednesday, November 18, 2015 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
The Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Gerald P. Schaus (Professor, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University), "Laconia and East Greece: Cultural Exchange in the Archaic Period"

This paper examines some cultural connections between Laconia and East Greece, including Lydian Sardis, in the Archaic Period, focusing on similarities in pottery decoration, but more broadly considering literary evidence and a variety of other archaeological sources.  Laconian products and influences found in East Greece are examined in light of evidence for Ionians visiting and working in Laconia.

Book Presentation/Reading by W. Ruth Kozak

Date: 
Wednesday, October 7, 2015 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
The Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Book Presentation/Reading by W. Ruth Kozak, “Shadow of the Lion: Blood on the Moon”

Taking fifteen years to write, Shadow of the Lion: Blood on the Moon is Volume One of an epic story set in the aftermath of the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the bloody Wars of Succession which follows as W. Ruth Kozak’s debut literary novel chronicles the journey of the newly appointed joint-kings, Alexander’s half-brother Philip Arridaios and his infant son, Iskander (Alexander IV).

W. Ruth Kozak is a Canadian travel journalist with a strong interest in history and archaeology. A frequent traveller, Ruth lived for several years in Greece and instructs classes in travel journalism and creative writing for the Vancouver School Board.

The novel was extensively researched in Greece, with the support of Classical scholars, the Greek Ministry of Culture, the Society of Macedonian Studies (Thessaloniki), the Finnish and Norwegian Institutes in Athens and with research undertaken in the Gennadius Library and the British Library in London.

Canadian Institute Open Meeting & Tristan Carter

Date: 
Wednesday, May 13, 2015 -
19:00 to 20:30
Location: 
Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Atene, Parthenonos 14-16
Event Description: 

David W. Rupp (Director), "The activities of the Institute 2014-2015"

Tristan Carter (McMaster University), "The Stélida Naxos Archaeological Project: Early Humans in the Aegean"

            Until relatively recently the Cycladic islands were not believed to have been colonised by humans until farmer arrived in the Late Neolithic, some 7000 years ago. This long-held view is now being reconfigured through the discovery by Greek archaeologists of a well-dated Mesolithic (late hunter-gatherer) village on Kythnos, and claimed Mesolithic – Middle Palaeolithic activities at Stélida on Naxos.

            This talk details the most recent work at Stélida, a two-year survey dedicated to mapping this chert source and its prehistoric stone tool workshops. We detail how the quarry was clearly being exploited from the Lower Palaeolithic (likely by Homo heidelbergensis), followed by major stone working in the Middle Palaeolithic (Neanderthals), and then through the earlier Upper Palaeolithic and Mesolithic (Homo sapiens), i.e. a history of (intermittent) usage that spans at least 300,000 – 9,000 years ago. The discovery of such early material on Naxos has potentially major significance for how we view the earliest peopling of Europe. With recent sea-level reconstructions suggesting a landbridge between Anatolia and the southern Greek mainland, Stélida may provide evidence that the Aegean represented a thoroughfare for early human migrations, rather than the barrier it was long considered to be.

Lecture by Nicholas Blackwell

Date: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2015 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr. Nicholas Blackwell (Assistant Director, The American School of Classical Studies at Athens), “Competitive and Emulative Mortuary Behavior on Early Iron Age Cyprus”

Lecture by Ειρήνη Λεγάκη

Date: 
Wednesday, April 1, 2015 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Ειρήνη Λεγάκη (Αρχαιολόγος της Εφορείας Αρχαιοτήτων Κυκλάδων, Υπ.Πο.Α.), “Νεώτερα αρχαιολογικά δεδομένα για τη Νάξο και τις Μικρές Κυκλάδες”

Τα τελευταία χρόνια έχουν έρθει στο φως στη Νάξο και τις Μικρές Κυκλάδες νέα στοιχεία είτε για άγνωστες έως σήμερα θέσεις προϊστορικών και ιστορικών χρόνων, είτε για ήδη γνωστές, τα οποία συνεισφέρουν στη γνώση για την προϊστορία και την ιστορία των παραπάνω νησιωτικών περιοχών. Κάποια δε από τα στοιχεία αυτά ενδεχομένως επαναπροσδιορίζουν τη θέση ορισμένων από τα παραπάνω νησιά στον ευρύτερο χώρο της Ευρωπαϊκής Προϊστορίας.

Pages