Past Events

Lecture by Hara Papatheodorou

Date: 
Wednesday, February 4, 2015 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Hara Papatheodorou (Emeritus Professor of Art History and the Visual Arts, The American College of Greece), “Angels: The Bureaucracy of the Divine”

The lecture will discuss the primary significance of angels, which lies not in who or what they are but in what they do – communicate God’s word to humankind.  Serving as heavenly messengers, guardians or intermediaries, angels represent the human belief in their power of meditating with the Divine – την ιερή μεσιτεία

They observe a strict hierarchical system based on the dualism of good and evil, which brings the Cosmos into being. Tracing their origin to the Assyro-Babylonian sun cult lamassu (winged bulls), the Christian angel will retain similar elements and functions, such as the Cherubim and Seraphim with their six pairs of wings and many eyes, guarding the throne of the Pantokrator (Almighty God) painted on the dome of the Greek Orthodox churches, or depicted on the conches of the dome.

The Judaic angelolatry soon will be enhanced by the Platonic philosophy of ideal Beauty (Καλόν κι αγαθόν), and the angel will function as psycho pomp leading man to the Apotheosis and salvation of his soul. Hence the early representations of angels in art carry wreaths with Christ’s initial within, indicating worship of the Resurrection.

Then, the theological writings by Pseudo-Dionysios Areopagitis influenced by the Neo-Platonists (Plotinos and Proklos) will create a static universe, which will obey the One, who in his turn will illuminate the nine Celestial Hierarchies of angels as his functionaries. Thus, the order of Cosmos becomes an ideal ideology for a feudal society.

Using comparative works of art, the lecture will illuminate the various roles of the angels as functionaries of the Divine via works of art.

Lecture by David W. Rupp

Date: 
Thursday, January 29, 2015 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
University of Victoria (Clearihue A212)
Event Description: 

David W. Rupp, "Canadians Take the Field: Over 30 Years of Archaeological Discoveries by the Canadian Institute in Greece"

Lecture by David W. Rupp

Date: 
Monday, January 26, 2015 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Hellenic Community Centre, Vancouver
Event Description: 

David W. Rupp, "Canadians Take the Field: Over 30 Years of Archaeological Discoveries by the Canadian Institute in Greece"

Lecture by David W. Rupp

Date: 
Friday, January 23, 2015 -
15:00 to 16:00
Location: 
University of Calgary (Department of Classics and Religion)
Event Description: 

Prof. David W. Rupp (Director, CIG), "Canadians Take the Field: Over 30 Years of Archaeological Discoveries by the Canadian Institute in Greece"

Lecture by David W. Rupp

Date: 
Thursday, January 22, 2015 -
19:00 to 20:00
Location: 
University of Alberta
Event Description: 

Prof. David W. Rupp (Director, CIG), "Canadians Take the Field: Over 30 Years of Archaeological Discoveries by the Canadian Institute in Greece"

Lecture by David W. Rupp

Date: 
Sunday, January 18, 2015 -
15:00 to 16:00
Location: 
University of Manitoba (237 University College)
Event Description: 

Prof. David W. Rupp (Director, CIG), "Canadians Take the Field: Over 30 Years of Archaeological Discoveries by the Canadian Institute in Greece"

NEW YEAR

Date: 
Monday, December 29, 2014 (All day) to Friday, January 2, 2015 (All day)
Event Description: 

The Institute will remain closed this week for New Year.

Type: 

CHRISTMAS

Date: 
Monday, December 22, 2014 (All day) to Friday, December 26, 2014 (All day)
Event Description: 

The Institute will remain closed this week for Christmas.

Type: 

Lecture by Athanasios Gekas, Christopher Grafos & Kali Petropoulos

Date: 
Wednesday, December 10, 2014 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Lecture by Athanasios Gekas, Christopher Grafos & Kali Petropoulos (York University: Co-Founders/Directors of the Greek Canadian History Project (GCHP) & Public Relations Coordinator of the GCHP), Memory and Migration: A Glimpse of Greek Immigrant Life in Toronto, 1864 - Present

The construction of ethnic communities in North America is a process of negotiation. What remnants of a migrant’s past are palatable to the host society and what aspects of the homeland survive the transatlantic voyage? This presentation examines these questions through a historical lens and chronicles the evolution of Greek identity in Toronto, Canada.

The lecture will be preceded by a brief presentation of the Greek Canadian History Project / Πρόγραμμα Έρευνας Ελληνο-Καναδικής Ιστορίας (http://archives.library.yorku.ca/gchp/), which aims to illuminate the history and events that have shaped the experiences of Greek immigrants in Canada and their descendants.

Lecture by Athanasios Gekas

Date: 
Wednesday, November 26, 2014 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Lecture by Athanasios Gekas (Assistant Professor, Hellenic Heritage Chair in Modern Greek History, Department of History, York University), Vanished States. A Regional Approach to the History of the Greek State in the Long Nineteenth Century (1798-1912)”

The recent controversy surrounding Greece has revived debates on the history of Greek state formation. In the past, historians and social scientists of Modern Greece suffered from the ‘backwardness syndrome’ - how ‘modern’ the Greek State was in comparison to European states - and placed too much emphasis on the ‘success’ of the nation-state after the revolution of 1821. The talk suggests that we think more broadly chronologically and conceptually to include various island states, now vanished, that formed and were gradually absorbed by the Greek Kingdom during the long nineteenth century: the Ionian State, the Principality of Samos and the Cretan Republic. A regional approach allows us to compare and contrast the various trajectories and regional histories of economies, institutions and identities and avoid a teleological and homogenizing approach to the formation of the Greek State. The history of these states explains the dependencies of Modern Greece to colonial empires (British, French, Russian) and the Ottoman Empire during a period of escalating antagonisms in the Mediterranean and stresses continuities instead of presumed radical breaks by showing the role of empire on Greek State formation.

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