Past Events

Lecture by David W. Rupp

Date: 
Sunday, January 18, 2015 -
15:00 to 16:00
Location: 
University of Manitoba (237 University College)
Event Description: 

Prof. David W. Rupp (Director, CIG), "Canadians Take the Field: Over 30 Years of Archaeological Discoveries by the Canadian Institute in Greece"

NEW YEAR

Date: 
Monday, December 29, 2014 (All day) to Friday, January 2, 2015 (All day)
Event Description: 

The Institute will remain closed this week for New Year.

Type: 

CHRISTMAS

Date: 
Monday, December 22, 2014 (All day) to Friday, December 26, 2014 (All day)
Event Description: 

The Institute will remain closed this week for Christmas.

Type: 

Lecture by Athanasios Gekas, Christopher Grafos & Kali Petropoulos

Date: 
Wednesday, December 10, 2014 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Lecture by Athanasios Gekas, Christopher Grafos & Kali Petropoulos (York University: Co-Founders/Directors of the Greek Canadian History Project (GCHP) & Public Relations Coordinator of the GCHP), Memory and Migration: A Glimpse of Greek Immigrant Life in Toronto, 1864 - Present

The construction of ethnic communities in North America is a process of negotiation. What remnants of a migrant’s past are palatable to the host society and what aspects of the homeland survive the transatlantic voyage? This presentation examines these questions through a historical lens and chronicles the evolution of Greek identity in Toronto, Canada.

The lecture will be preceded by a brief presentation of the Greek Canadian History Project / Πρόγραμμα Έρευνας Ελληνο-Καναδικής Ιστορίας (http://archives.library.yorku.ca/gchp/), which aims to illuminate the history and events that have shaped the experiences of Greek immigrants in Canada and their descendants.

Lecture by Athanasios Gekas

Date: 
Wednesday, November 26, 2014 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Lecture by Athanasios Gekas (Assistant Professor, Hellenic Heritage Chair in Modern Greek History, Department of History, York University), Vanished States. A Regional Approach to the History of the Greek State in the Long Nineteenth Century (1798-1912)”

The recent controversy surrounding Greece has revived debates on the history of Greek state formation. In the past, historians and social scientists of Modern Greece suffered from the ‘backwardness syndrome’ - how ‘modern’ the Greek State was in comparison to European states - and placed too much emphasis on the ‘success’ of the nation-state after the revolution of 1821. The talk suggests that we think more broadly chronologically and conceptually to include various island states, now vanished, that formed and were gradually absorbed by the Greek Kingdom during the long nineteenth century: the Ionian State, the Principality of Samos and the Cretan Republic. A regional approach allows us to compare and contrast the various trajectories and regional histories of economies, institutions and identities and avoid a teleological and homogenizing approach to the formation of the Greek State. The history of these states explains the dependencies of Modern Greece to colonial empires (British, French, Russian) and the Ottoman Empire during a period of escalating antagonisms in the Mediterranean and stresses continuities instead of presumed radical breaks by showing the role of empire on Greek State formation.

Screening of a Canadian Film

Date: 
Wednesday, November 5, 2014 -
19:30 to 21:00
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Canadian Film: “Our Man in Tehran” (85 minutes; English; 2013)

"Our Man in Tehran" is a Canadian documentary directed by Drew Taylor and Larry Weinstein that chronicles the true story of Canada's former ambassador to Iran, Ken Taylor, who was responsible for the high-risk rescue of six U.S. diplomats trapped in Iran. The film is Canada's response to the Hollywood feature "Argo" uncovering new information on the 1979 hostage crisis and adding ample valuable content.

The world watched with fear in November 1979, when Iranian students infiltrated and occupied the American embassy in Tehran. The Americans were caught entirely by surprise, and what began as a swift and seemingly short-lived takeover evolved into a crisis that would see fifty four embassy personnel held hostage, most for 444 days. As Tehran exploded in a fury of revolution, six American diplomats secretly escaped. For three months, Ken Taylor, the Canadian ambassador to Iran—along with his wife and embassy staffers—concealed the Americans in their homes, always with the prospect that the revolutionary government of Ayatollah Khomeini would exact deadly consequences. The United States found itself handcuffed by a fractured, fundamentalist government it could not understand and had completely underestimated. With limited intelligence resources available on the ground and anti-American sentiment growing, President Carter turned to Taylor to work with the CIA in developing their exfiltration plans. Until now, the true story behind Taylor’s involvement in the escape of the six diplomats and the Eagle Claw commando raid has remained classified.

"OCHI" DAY

Date: 
Tuesday, October 28, 2014 (All day)
Event Description: 

The Institute will remain closed today for the "Ochi" Day holiday.

Type: 

Lecture by James Horncastle

Date: 
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 -
19:30 to 20:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute in Greece, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Lecture by James Horncastle, (PhD Candidate, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Centre for Hellenic Studies, Simon Fraser University), Temperature Falling: The Greek Civil War and the Origins of the Cold War”

Traditional examinations of the Cold War usually encompass any political development in the immediate post-Second World War period until the collapse of the Soviet Union. Nevertheless, the linkages between the Greek Civil War and the Cold War have often been obscured, or portrayed in binary terms, which detracts from the analytical process. Upon critical examination of the available source material, however, it becomes clear that the Greek Civil War was not only the first proxy war during the Cold War, but also the arena where what would become the two opposing blocs defined their own identities. In so doing, the Greek Civil War helped to shape many of the major dynamics of what would become the Cold War.

SUMMER HOLIDAY

Date: 
Friday, August 1, 2014 (All day) to Friday, August 29, 2014 (All day)
Event Description: 

The Institute's offices and library will remain closed this month for the annual summer recess. (Our accommodations operate as normal.)

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PENTECOST

Date: 
Monday, June 9, 2014 (All day)
Event Description: 

The Institute will remain closed today for the Pentecost holiday.

Type: 

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