Other Events

David W. Rupp

Date: 
Monday, September 20, 2021 - 12:30 to 13:30
Location: 
via Zoom
Event Description: 

Emeritus Professor David W. Rupp (Brock University), "The House of Eustolios at Ancient Kourion, Cyprus: An elite “Mega Mansion” of the Late Roman Period"

In the mid-1930’s a team from the University Museum of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia undertook a series of excavations in the region of the Iron Age city-kingdom of ancient Kourion on the southern coast of Cyprus. One of these excavations on the later acropolis of Kourion uncovered the remains of a large Late Roman complex with a bath suite. The extensive tessellated mosaic floors of the structure, with six tessellated inscriptions in them, have attracted scholarly attention over the years. In the absence of a definitive publication of the architectural remains, the mosaic floors and the finds a wide range of conflicting suggestions have been proposed for the primary function(s) of this structure. The overt Christian references in three of the inscriptions have dominated this discourse.

This sprawling structure has limited points of access and is organized around a forecourt and a central courtyard with flanking corridors. A series of suites of rooms designed for reception and for banqueting along with a complete bath suite as well as wings for other activities surround these open spaces.  The best comparanda for this collection of recurring architectural features and for the placement of mosaic floors can be found in the urban elite mansions of the 4th and 5th centuries CE in the eastern Mediterranean region.

Based on these Late Roman comparisons the most logical suggestion for the function of this structure, built in the second quarter of the 5th century CE, is that it too was an urban elite townhouse or “Mega-Mansion”.  A wealthy Christian aristocrat, one Eustolios mentioned in one of the inscriptions, lived here where he received his clients and entertained his peers. The inscriptions and the iconographical elements of the floors indicated his command of Graeco-Roman paideia. Thus, the best appellation for the structure is the “House of Eustolios”.

 

Emeritus Professor David W. Rupp (Brock University) was a member of the Department of Classics at Brock University, Canada for 35 years. He was Director of the Canadian Institute in Greece from 2005 to 2018.

Professor Rupp’s research interests are diverse including:  Greek altars; Athenian topography; archaeological survey theory and practice; Chalcolithic period in Cyprus; secondary state formation and sociopolitical complexity in Iron Age Cyprus; Late Minoan III period in eastern Crete; Minoan seal iconography; Late Roman floor mosaics in Cyprus.

Stavros Paspalas

Date: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021 - 11:30 to 12:30
Location: 
via Zoom
Event Description: 

Dr Stavros Paspalas (AAIA Director), "Monuments of the Athenian Acropolis in the  Modern Greek State, 1821-1921"

There is no doubt that when most of us think of ancient Greece our mind will immediately present us with a mental image of the Athenian Acropolis with its four fifth-century buildings –the Parthenon, the Propylaia, the Temple of Athena Nike and the Erechtheion. Buildings which, although in ruins, have assumed the status of potent cultural icons. However, at the end of the Greek Revolution the Acropolis was totally different. Preserved upon it were the remains of nigh on 1,500 years of human occupation and activities since the construction of the surviving ancient buildings, testaments to the Acropolis’, and wider Athenian, history. The story of how the Acropolis was transformed from a garrison village to an archaeological park is a fascinating one which offers us insights into the history of modern Greece and its relationship to antiquity all the while set against a backdrop of the Ottoman past and the Greeks’ relationship with western Europe.

Dr Stavros Paspalas (AAIA), will be Introduced by Professor Vrasidas Karalis (Sir Nicholas Laurantus Professor of Modern Greek, Department of Modern Greek and Byzantine Studies, University of Sydney).

This event is co-hosted by St. Catherine Greek Orthodox Church Mascot and the Department of Modern Greek.

 

Dr Paspalas was appointed as the Director of the AAIA in 2020, having previously served as Acting Director since 2016. Dr Paspalas has undertaken fieldwork at Zagora on Andros, Torone in the Chalkidike and on the island of Kythera. His major research interests range from the Early Iron Age Aegean, through to ancient Greek ceramics, and onto Greek-Achaemenid relations.

Dr Paspalas has led the University of Sydney and AAIA Athens Classical Archaeology Intensive Program in collaboration with the University of Sydney’s Archaeology Department.

Dimitris Kousouris

Date: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021 - 18:00 to 19:00
Location: 
École française d’Athènes - Didotou 6
Event Description: 

Dimitris Kousouris - Université de Vienne
Les cinquantenaires de la Révolution grecque (1871, 1921, 1971) : conjonctures mémorielles et enjeux historiographiques

Peter Frankopan

Date: 
Thursday, October 7, 2021 - 19:00 to 20:00
Location: 
Cotsen Hall, ASCSA
Event Description: 

The Gennadius Library of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens invites you to the inaugural Thalia Potamianos Annual Lecture Series on the Impact of Greek Culture. Dr. Peter Frankopan will present the first of his three-part series of lectures, "Global Greece: A History," on Thursday, October 7, 2021, in Cotsen Hall at the American School's campus in Athens.

Subsequent lectures will be presented in the United States in 2022. All lectures will also be livestreamed on the School's website.

Lecture One: "Greece: Beginnings", Thursday, October 7, 2021, 7 p.m. EEST/12 p.m. EDT, Cotsen Hall, Athens

Lecture Two: "Greece: Legacies", Wednesday, March 16, 2022, Time to be announced, Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium, Washington, D.C.

Lecture Three: "Greece: Futures", Tuesday, May 10, 2022, Time to be announced, St. Bartholomew's Church, New York City

To receive updates about the latest School news and events, please subscribe to our email newsletter at ascsa.edu.gr/email-subscribe.

 

About Peter Frankopan

Dr. Peter Frankopan is Professor of Global History at Oxford University, where he is Stavros Niarchos Director of the Oxford Centre for Byzantine Research. Dr. Frankopan is a world-renowned historian and an award-winning author who will present "Global Greece: A History" for the inaugural Thalia Potamianos Annual Lecture Series. His lectures will examine the role that Greece, Greek culture, literature, and language have played over the course of more than two and a half millennia. Rather than exploring the familiar and limited Mediterranean context, they are looked at from a global perspective, allowing not only a better understanding of world history but of Greece itself.

Dr. Frankopan's academic interests include the history of the Byzantine Empire, Eastern Mediterranean, Russia, the Middle East, Central Asia, and China. His book The First Crusade: The Call from the East looks at the Crusades not from the perspective of the Latin West but of Constantinople and Byzantium. It was described as making "the most significant contribution to rethinking the origins and course of the First Crusade for a generation" (TLS). This followed on from Dr. Frankopan's translation of The Alexiad (Penguin Classics, 2009) by Anna Komnene, perhaps the most famous of all Byzantine histories.

His best-selling book The Silk Roads: A New History of the World was described as "magnificent" (Sunday Times) and "not just the most important history book in years, but the most important in decades" (Berliner Zeitung).

 
Thalia Potamianos Annual Lecture Series

Established in June 2020, the Thalia Potamianos Annual Lectures Series seeks to create a stimulating environment to draw both the academic community and the general public to the Gennadius Library of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. Every year, a highly distinguished, internationally renowned scholar is selected to conduct research and develop programs on a topic relevant to the Gennadius Library. The research will culminate in a minimum of three annual public lectures, which will be delivered in Athens and the United States.

The Thalia Potamianos lectures are being made possible by a generous grant from Phokion Potamianos, an Overseer of the Gennadius Library. Mr. Potamianos named the series in memory of his grandmother, a distinguished Greek doctor, academic, and philanthropist.

Metaxia Tsipopoulou

Date: 
Monday, October 18, 2021 - 11:30 to 12:30
Location: 
via Zoom
Event Description: 

Dr Metaxia Tsipopoulou, "Innovative Burial Practices in a Persistent Memory Landscape: House Tomb 2 in the Pre- and Protopalatial Cemetery of Petras-Kephala, Siteia, Crete"

Petras, located 2km to the east of the town of Siteia in NE Crete, is a unique monumental complex, which has been archaeologically investigated since 1985 under Dr Tsipopoulou’s direction. A Minoan palace, three settlements and two cemeteries have been excavated; revealing that human occupation in the area started in 3400 BC and continued uninterrupted until 1200 BC.
On Kephala hill an extensive, unplundered cemetery has been excavated since 2004. It is the largest Pre- and Protopalatial cemetery in Crete, covering more than 4000m2, used for 1000 years. It was used exclusively by elite families of the palatial settlement. To date 24 large house tombs with complex plans, nine burial structures and a burial rockshelter have been excavated. Precious grave goods, made mostly of imported materials (gold, silver, bronze, ivory and semi-precious stones) testify to an affluent society. Petras was a gateway for trade with the Eastern Mediterranean and the Aegean for almost two millennia to the end of the Protopalatial period, ca 1750 BC.

The Protopalatial House Tomb 2 (1850-1700 BC) is by far the most important in the whole cemetery for a variety of reasons, including its position, its architecture, the grave goods and the exclusive connection with a large ceremonial area. The history of the use of this area as an elite burial place is presented in this lecture. The first burials dated back to the third millennium BC. (Early Minoan II period) and included two primary female burials as well as secondary burials of children with a large amount of exotic grave goods made of imported materials. Above them, still before the construction of the large House Tomb 2, there were a series of primary and secondary burials, of men, women and children, also accompanied by a significant quantity of very rich grave goods. This unique chronological sequence is presented in the lecture and the reasons for the occupation of this area, measuring circa 110m2 are investigated.

 
Dr Metaxia Tsopopoulou (National Archive of Monuments of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Tourism) is a specialist of the Bronze Age and the Early Iron Age in the Aegean and Crete in particular.  She holds a Ph.D. from the University of Athens. She conducted post-doctoral research at the University of Bristol, U.K. and was based at the State University of New York Buffalo as a Fulbright Scholar. She has had a long career in the Archaeological Service of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture, most of it spent in Crete. Between 2007 and 2011 she was the director of the National Archive of Monuments of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture and Tourism. She is Director of excavations at Petras.

Christina Koulouri

Date: 
Thursday, October 21, 2021 - 18:00 to 19:00
Location: 
École française d’Athènes - Didotou 6
Event Description: 

Christina Koulouri - Université Panteion
Les commémorations de la Révolution Grecque: lieux de mémoire et identité nationale

James C. Wright

Date: 
Thursday, November 4, 2021 - 19:00 to 20:00
Location: 
Swedish Institute at Athens, Mitseon 9
Event Description: 

Lectures in Honour of Professor Robin Hägg

Professor James C. Wright, "An Archaeological History of the Mycenaean Palace" (lecture 1 of 2)

James C. Wright

Date: 
Friday, November 5, 2021 - 19:00 to 20:00
Location: 
Swedish Institute at Athens, Mitseon 9
Event Description: 

Lectures in Honour of Professor Robin Hägg

Professor James C. Wright, "An Archaeological History of the Mycenaean Palace" (lecture 2 of 2)

Dimitris Plantzos

Date: 
Thursday, November 25, 2021 - 18:00 to 19:00
Location: 
École française d’Athènes - Didotou 6
Event Description: 

Dimitris Plantzos - Université d’Athènes
We Have Always Been Ancient: Greece Celebrating its Modernity as a Confirmation of its Antiquity

International Workshop

Date: 
Monday, November 29, 2021 - 09:00 to 20:00
Location: 
École française d’Athènes
Event Description: 

Greek Pottery of the 4th cent. B.C. New Data from the Field

How can the study of the pottery help us better understand its contexts of use and deposition, in order to approach society and economy of the 4th century BC? The aim of this workshop is to present new material of the Late Classical period from well-defined archaeological contexts. Participants are invited to discuss material assemblages including all categories of pottery (fine wares, plain wares, cooking pots and transport amphorae) and not only the output of specific workshops and painters.
This workshop will focus on two main topics. The first explores the use and function of a single shape or of a varied pottery assemblage in relation to social practices or ritual performances in domestic, public, sacred or funerary contexts. Do the use and the function of a vessel remain the same in contexts of different nature? For instance, how can we interpret cooking pots found beyond the Classical oikos in sanctuaries and cemeteries, and approach the people who used them? Studies on the contents of pots combining functional and chemical analysis will be mostly welcomed.
Papers may also discuss commercial networks and mobility of pots and potters. The goal of this second topic is to depart from an Athenocentric point of view and to highlight regional dynamics in the circulation and consumption of pottery in the 4th century BC Greek world. New insights on the analysis of imported pots and their adaptations by local craftspeople, as well as results of archaeometrical studies are expected to throw new light on this topic.

This workshop will take place in the premises of the École française d’Athènes on the 29th of November 2021 according to the sanitary conditions and restrictions due to the pandemic of COVID-19. Participants will be immediately notified of any changes to the format of the workshop.

The language of the workshop will be English only. Each paper should not exceed 20 minutes and will be followed by a discussion. We aim to provide accommodation for up to two nights and refund of the travel expenses to a limited number of participants who cannot benefit from the financial support of their institution. Interested applicants should state this clearly in their paper proposals.

If you wish to present a paper, please send a title, a short abstract (max. 300 words) and your contact information by the 31st of August 2021 to guy.ackermann@efa.gr and/or vasiliki.vlachou@efa.gr

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