Categories: 2022

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Categories: 2022

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The new academic year has begun at the Institute, and we welcome the Institute’s 2022-2023 Homer and Dorothy Thompson Fellow, Shannon Crewson, Wilfrid Laurier University intern, Sarah Bidinosti, and University of Waterloo intern, Aaron Westrik.

Shannon Crewson is a PhD candidate in Anthropology at McMaster University, under the supervision of Prof. Tristan Carter. Her thesis, “The Challenges of Representing Long-Term Histories: A Pleistocene to Anthropocene Case Study at Stelida, Naxos” focuses on narrative approaches to writing prehistory for public audiences and incorporates archaeology, anthropology, history, and earth sciences to examine how we can meaningfully represent long-term cultural histories.

Shannon is using the case study of a single site, Stelida, whose history of human engagement with the hill spans from at least 200,000 years ago. Her thesis consists of two components: first, the development of a historical narrative of Stelida, examining themes including climate and subsistence, raw material extraction and vantage point/communication, rather than periods, through which we might represent deep-time human experience at the site. Secondly, she will be creating an accessible museological narrative, culminating with an exhibition on Naxos and an associated bilingual (English and Greek) website.

With the support of the Canadian Institute in Greece and the Homer and Dorothy Thompson Fellowship, Shannon wishes to complete her collection of primary research data – including site visits to several archaeological museums to understand how archaeology is being interpreted in these spaces and to examine how museums are presenting different periods (from the Palaeolithic to present day). Secondly, she plans to travel to Naxos to continue collecting local histories at Stelida. This project aims to place Stelida amongst the grander historical narratives globally. Moreover, it aims to engage the public in these narratives, and while situated locally and pitched at Stelida’s various stakeholder communities, the project’s intellectual foundations and representational methods will have pertinence and utility for archaeologists and museums globally.

Sarah Bidinosti is a fourth-year undergraduate student at Wilfrid Laurier University, majoring in Archaeology and Heritage Studies, with a minor in Criminology. Through her current studies, Sarah has developed an interest in working with human remains. She particularly enjoys analyzing the health of individuals as influenced by societal structures. Upon graduation, she intends to continue her education by pursuing bioarchaeology at a graduate level.

With the opportunity to work as an intern at the Canadian Institute in Greece, Sarah hopes to gain a first-hand experience working in the field of archaeology, beyond the preliminary research and excavation stages, in order to be well versed in the discipline. This placement will allow her to immerse herself in Greek culture, while learning about the history of Greek civilization and its people.

Aaron Westrik is a fourth year undergraduate student studying Classics at the University of Waterloo. His plan is to continue studying linguistics at the graduate level either continuing in the path of Classics or shifting his focus into Theological Studies.

His main interest in Classics comes from a fascination in linguistics, particularly Latin and Ancient Greek. In addition to these two he has also studied Hebrew for a year taking a couple of courses with McMaster University. His favourite texts thus far are from Hellenistic Poetry. With each poem having so much meaning and alluding to so many other classical works, they have such depth which makes them particularly enjoyable. Moreover, he appreciates that some of these texts are quoted in the New Testament connecting the Classical and Biblical worlds together.

Serving as an intern at the Institute is a great opportunity for Aaron to take in the sights and sounds of Greek culture. He plans to expand his knowledge of the Greek language connecting some of the Ancient Greek that he has already knows with the Modern Greek so visibly present all around Athens.

Jonathan Tomlinson
Assistant Director

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