Upcoming Events

Lecture by Sabrina Higgins

Date: 
Wednesday, October 18, 2017 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Sabrina Higgins (Assistant Professor, Stavros Niarchos Foundation Centre for Hellenic Studies, Simon Fraser University), “Imagining the Virgin: 'The Intersection of Space, Monumentality and Marian Iconography in Late Antique and Early Medieval Egypt (Third to Eleventh Centuries)”

This talk contextualizes the iconography of the Virgin Mary within the framework of Late-Antique and Early Medieval Egyptian Christianity. It situates the creation of a visual culture associated with the Virgin within its historical parameters, particularly highlighting the relatively late appearance of Marian imagery on the chronological axis of Christian Art, and examines the unique spatial considerations for the placement of these images. In doing so, the talk traces the diachronic appearance of particular Marian iconographies, while also interrogating whether particular images were localized to specific areas within ecclesiastical and monastic settings.

Lecture by Emily K. Varto

Date: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr. Emily K. Varto (Associate Professor, Department of Classics, Dalhousie University), "The Politics of Fatness in Archaic Greece"

This talk explores how modern narratives that imbue fatness with personal and communal ethical significance compare to ancient narratives of fatness, particularly in archaic Greece politics. Through examining art and poetry, it explores how fatness was not exactly a marker of elite status, but was a metaphor of the abuse of status with economic, social, and moral consequences for family, community, and state. Although elitism was central to the significance of fatness in archaic Greece, so were ideas about uncontrollable appetite, lack of restraint, and communal harm familiar to us from modern narratives about obesity and socio-economic class.

Lecture by Nanno Marinatos

Date: 
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Nanno Marinatos (Professor, Department of Classics and Mediterranean Studies, University of Illinois at Chicago), “Thucydides and Pericles: Democracy and Empire”

Pericles has been traditionally identified with Athenian democracy but has also received criticism about the imperialism of Athens from modern historians. The issue is indeed complex since democracy contradicts tyranny over others. The problem is solved if one analyses Thucydides' own opinion. He is shown to be a partisan of Pericles and presents him as a political pragmatist who had a deep understanding of human nature, on the one hand, and benefits of justice, on the other.

Lecture by Rodney D. Fitzsimons

Date: 
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 -
19:30 to 21:30
Location: 
Canadian Institute, Dionysiou Aiginitou 7
Event Description: 

Dr. Rodney D. Fitzsimons (Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Trent University), "Taking a Seat at the Minoan Banquet: An Architectural Approach to the Minoanisation of the Aegean Islands"

The dissemination of “Minoanising” cultural traits throughout the Aegean in the latter half of the second millennium BC has long been of interest to archaeologists working in this region of the ancient world, with recent scholarship stressing the active, rather than passive, role played by the indigenous inhabitants of the various territories participating in this process. While much emphasis has rightly been placed on the adoption and adaptation of the wide range of “imported” artefactual, artistic, administrative, and technological cultural traits throughout the region, comparable changes in the built environment that resulted from the same phenomena of “Minoanisation” have received relatively little attention to date beyond basic enumeration. This paper seeks to address this lacuna in current scholarship, using as a starting point the Northeast Bastion at Ayia Irini, Kea, where a new Minoan-style banquet hall has recently been identified, and then reassessing the evidence for and significance of the adoption and adaptation of Minoan-style architectural motifs elsewhere in the southern and eastern Aegean. The focus of this study will fall not on the ultimate origin of “imported” architectural elements, but rather on the significant changes that the adoption and adaptation of such motifs wrought on the local physical, cultural, and socio-political landscapes.

John Bintliff

Date: 
Sunday, January 21, 2018 -
14:00 to 15:00
Location: 
R303 Paterson Hall, Carleton University, Ottawa
Event Description: 

The Early Greek polis.

By: John Bintliff, Leiden University

 

Sponsored by: the Archaeological Institute of America in Canada in collaboration with the John MacNaughton Cahir of Classics at McGill Univ. and the Ottawa Association of Friends of CIG.